Computer Forensics & Data Recovery has articles on a wide variety of subjects relating to Computer Forensics - Data Recovery, Computer Crime, Cryptography, Freeware Computer Forensic Toolkit.

 

Fresh Advice:

The most important part of your PC is your data. In the event of a serious system crash, you can usually restore the operating system and programs that you use, but your personal data may be lost. Although emergency data recovery options are available, these will tend to be costly and there is no guarantee that everything you want can be recovered. A better approach is to start a regular routine of backing up your important data.

 

Your data should be backed up as often as possible, It isn't necessary to back up your whole hard drive. Identify the folders that hold your important files and only back those folders up to save on storage space. To find out where your files are being stored, use "Save As" instead of just hitting "Save" when you create or update your files, and note the location the program is using to write your data.

Secret Vs Public Key

 

Secret key cryptography and public key cryptography are the two major cryptographic architectures.

Secret Keys - Symmetric System
The first method uses a secret key, such as the DES and AES algorithms. Both sender and receiver use the same key to encrypt and decrypt. This is the fastest computation method, but getting the secret key to the recipient in the first place is a problem that is often handled by the second method.

Public Keys - Asymmetric System
The second method uses a two-part key, such as RSA and El Gamal. Each recipient has a private key that is kept secret and a public key that is published for everyone. The sender looks up or is sent the recipient's public key and uses it to encrypt the message. The recipient uses the private key to decrypt the message and never publishes or transmits the private key to anyone. Thus, the private key is never in transit and remains invulnerable.

Both Are Used Together
Secret key and public key systems are often used together, such as the AES secret key and the RSA public key. The secret key method provides the fastest decryption, and the public key method provides a convenient way to transmit the secret key. This is called a "digital envelope." For example, the PGP e-mail encryption program uses one of several public key methods to send the secret key along with the message that has been encrypted with that secret key (see PGP).

Get Faster - Get Stronger
It has been said that any encryption code can be broken given enough time to compute all permutations. However, if it takes months to break a code, the war could already be lost, or the thief could have long absconded with the money from the forged financial transaction. As computers get faster, to stay ahead of the game, encryption algorithms have to become stronger by using longer keys and more clever techniques.

 

Cryptographic Methods - Posted on 10/1/2008

Computer Crime and Computer Forensics - Posted on 2/1/2008

The Freeware Forenic Toolkit - Posted on 6/12/2007

 

 

 

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